It’s a thick, hot, hazy reality outside my door.

The Klamath River looks like a painter cleaned a brush of paint there – a flat, bright, unsettling green.

Fish are dying, sprinklers are cranking, ditches are ripping, and bureaucrats are doing nothing. Up the canyon, what would ordinarily be salmon redds are dry islands. People who love fish are coming together to get dams out and demand more cold water in our rivers. Carpools are being organized, protest signs made, banners dropped.

The mountains are on fire. My neighbors are evacuating. Roads are closed. It’s hard to see or think far ahead in these conditions.

Plums and beets need canning again. My feet hurt again.

My calendar reminds me of dates with landpartners and old friends and grant deadlines.

My hardrive is full, my computer tells me. I wonder how long I will be able to put that off.

At least there’s a wilderness next door and wonderful people to explore it with. At least there are shelves full of engaging books. And clean water in the creek, and a garden of good, organic food I helped to grow.

A particularly big tree on the non-trail into the Marble Mountain wilderness through McCash Creek.

A particularly big tree on the non-trail into the Marble Mountain wilderness through McCash Creek.

Meteor Lake moon rise reflection.

Meteor Lake moon rise reflection.

Smoke from the Whites Fire as seen from a ridge along the southwestern edge of the Marble Mountain Wilderness.

Smoke from the Whites Fire as seen from a ridge along the southwestern edge of the Marble Mountain Wilderness.

Fellow trail blazers above the drop down into the Cuddihy Lake basin.

Fellow trail blazers above the drop down into the Cuddihy Lake basin.

Wildflower field near camp.

Wildflower field near camp.

 

The furthest Cuddihy lake was cool, clear and deep - perfect for swimming.

The furthest Cuddihy lake was cool, clear and deep – perfect for swimming.

 

Advertisements